B-ENT

Early experience in transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for non-oropharyngeal head and neck malignancies: a review of functional and oncologic outcomes

1.

Department of torhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

2.

Department of Oncology, section Head and Neck Oncology, KU Leuven, Leuven Belgium

3.

Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

4.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, section Head and Neck Oncology, KU Leuven, Leuven Belgium

B-ENT 2015; 11: Supplement 21-31
Read: 428 Downloads: 354 Published: 04 February 2020

Early experience in transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for non-oropharyngeal head and neck malignancies: a review of functional and oncologic outcomes. Objective: To review and summarize functional and oncologic outcomes after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for non-oropharyngeal head and neck malignancies. Data Sources: The MEDLINE database and bibliographies of relevant studies were searched through December 2014.

Methods: Search strategy was ((transoral) AND surgery) AND robotics) OR TORS. Abstracts and titles were screened for relevance and full articles of the selected records were evaluated and critically appraised after inclusion. Data concerning functional and oncologic outcomes as well as adverse effects were collected.

Results: 22 records were eventually included in the review. For TORS in the treatment of glottic, hypopharyngeal ands supraglottic cancer we retained 3 case series (26 patients), 5 case series (36 patients) and 6 case series (67 patients) respectively. 8 case reports/series (14 patients) assessing safety and feasibility of TORS for tumours in the parapharyngeal space, nasopharynx and skull base were also evaluated. In general, treatment of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer by means of TORS seems to be feasible and safe with satisfying functional and short-term oncologic results. For treatment of malignant tumours in the parapharyngeal space, nasopharynx and skull base, the benefits of TORS, when compared to classic surgical techniques, are still uncertain and are particularly based on theoretical advantages.

Conclusion: TORS offers an interesting new approach for treating non-oropharyngeal head and neck malignancies. However, long term results are still not reported and TORS should be directly compared to existing therapeutic options in randomized controlled trials. Until then, its use should be subject to critical appraisal.

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EISSN 2684-4907