Title:
Airway intervention in cases of acute epiglottitis
Authors:
Y. Shimizu, E. Mori, K. Wada, N. Otori and H. Kojima
Institutions:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The Jikei University Daisan Hospital, 4-11-1 Izumihoncho, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-0003, Japan; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, 6-11-1 Omorinishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-8541, Japan; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishishinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461, Japan
Keywords:
Epiglottitis; tracheotomy; intubation; indication
Pages:
279 - 284
Abstract:
Airway intervention in cases of acute epiglottitis.Problem/objectives: In cases of acute epiglottitis, indications for airway intervention have not been established. In the present study, we reviewed patients with acute epiglottitis to identify clinical factors, which suggest airway intervention should be performed. Methodology: Patients with acute epiglottitis admitted to The Jikei University Daisan Hospital (Tokyo) from 2004 to 2013 were identified. Patients’ characteristics, histories, laryngoscopic findings and laboratory findings were reviewed and analysed. Results: Of the 83 patients (82 adults and one adolescent) in the sample, 16 (19%) underwent airway intervention and conservative treatment. The factors that were significantly more likely to have been present in patients who received airway intervention were odynophagia, drooling, hoarseness, muffled voice, dyspnoea, swelling of the posterior side of the epiglottis, less than 50% of the glottis area being visible with laryngoscopy, and a high white blood cell (WBC) count. The only factor that was shown by multiple logistic regression analysis to be distinctively predictive of airway intervention was “less than 50% of the glottis area being visible” (P = .000, odds ratio = 23.630, sensitivity = 86.6%, specificity = 78.6%, predictive accuracy = 85.2%). Conclusions: When considering whether airway intervention should be performed in cases of acute epiglottitis, the most important clinical factor is the laryngoscopic finding that “less than 50% of the glottis area being visible.” Other important clinical factors to consider are odynophagia, drooling, hoarseness, muffled voice, dyspnoea, swelling of the posterior side of the epiglottis and a high WBC count.
Issue:
Vol. 12, 2016, 4th trimester


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Airway intervention in cases of acute epiglottitis