Title:
How does electronic cigarette smoking affect sinonasal symptoms and nasal mucociliary clearance?
Authors:
T. L. Kumral, Z. Saltürk, G. Yldrm, Y. Uyar, G. Berkiten, Y. Atar and M. Inan
Institutions:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology­Head and Neck Surgery, Okmeydan Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Keywords:
Electronic cigarette; SNOT-22, mucociliary clearance; smoking cessation
Pages:
17 - 21
Abstract:
Howdoeselectroniccigarettesmokingaffectsinonasalsymptomsandnasalmucociliaryclearance?Objective: is to evaluate the sinonasal symptom scores and mucociliary clearance (MCC) after starting to use electronic cigarette Methodolgy: This prospective randomized single-blind clinical trial was conducted between March 2013 and November 2013. Patients (n=98) admitted to smoking cessation clinic were divided into two groups; Electronic cigarette smokers (group 1) and non-electronic cigarette smokers (group 2). SNOT-22 and saccharin transit time for MCC were evaluated before starting electronic cigarettes and after the third months. Results: SNOT-22 scores and MCC time were evaluated between groups and within groups after 3 months. SNOT 22 scores and MCC measurements showed no difference between groups before the cessation of cigarette smoking (> p0.05). SNOT22resultsofbothgroupsrevealedstatisticallysignificantlylowerscoresafterthethreemonths(p<0.05).However, SNOT­22 scores of group 2 was significantly better than group 1 (p>0.05). Comparison of MCC results of group 2 revealed statistically significantly lower scores after the three months (p<0.05). However, group 1 did not show any significant difference after three months (p>0.05). There was a significant difference between the groups at the third month measurements (p<0.05). Conclusions: Although EC is widely used as a method of quitting smoking, it has negative effects on the sinonasal symptoms and MCC.
Issue:
Vol. 12, 2016, 1st trimester


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How does electronic cigarette smoking affect sinonasal symptoms and nasal mucociliary clearance?