Title:
Human papilloma virus detection in oropharyngeal cancer with gargle samples
Authors:
T. Imai, I. Sato,K. Matsumoto,Y. Asada, K. Kato, S. Sagai, K. Watanabe, R. Sadayasu, S. Saijo and K. Matsuura
Institutions:
Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori, Miyagi, Japan; Department of Pathology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori, Miyagi, Japan; Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori, Miyagi, Japan
Keywords:
Human papilloma virus; oropharyngeal cancer; analytic sample preparation methods; real-time polymerase chain reaction
Pages:
263 - 269
Abstract:
Abstract. Human papilloma virus detection in oropharyngeal cancer with gargle samples. Objective: human papilloma virus (HPV) is a major risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and knowledge of a patient’s HPV status is clinically important in terms of treatment and prognosis. The practicality of using oral gargle samples to reliably detect HPV in patients with OPSCC remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of HPV detection in gargle samples of OPSCC patients using an HPV-dedicated nucleic acid amplification test (cobas 4800 HPV Test; Roche Diagnostics K.K.). Methodology: 15 patients with histologically proven OPSCC were evaluated from May 2014 to March 2015. Swab sam- ples served as positive controls and were tested using both the Hybrid Capture II HPV Test (HC-II; Digene Corporation) and the cobas 4800 HPV Test. Oral gargle samples were tested using the cobas 4800 HPV Test. Five of the 15 patients were confirmed to be HPV-positive by a combination of p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV-DNA in situ hybridization and nucleic acid amplification. Results: the sensitivity and specificity of the gargling method were 60% and 100%, respectively. No false-positives were obtained. Detection of HPV in two very small tumours rising from the base of the tongue was difficult and these cases were overlooked as HPV-negative. Conclusions: use of the gargling method to determine HPV positivity in OPSCC patients appears feasible, except in patients with very small tumours. Real-time polymerase chain reaction using gargle samples may have greater clinical efficacy than the swabbing method.
Issue:
Vol. 12, 2016, 4th trimester


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Human papilloma virus detection in oropharyngeal cancer with gargle samples