Title:
Predicting 3-year outcomes of early-identified children with hearing impairment
Authors:
T. Y. C. Ching, J. Day, M. Seeto, H. Dillon, V. Marnane and L. Street
Institutions:
National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia; The HEARing CRC, Melbourne, Australia
Keywords:
Child; deafness; universal newborn hearing screening; outcomes
Pages:
99 - 106
Abstract:
Predicting 3-year outcomes of early-identified children with hearing impairment. Problem/Objectives: Perma- nent childhood hearing loss has major negative impacts on childrens health and development. To improve outcomes, universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) has been implemented widely. However, high-quality evidence on its efficacy was lacking. To address this evidence gap, we conducted the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study to directly compare outcomes of early- and late-identified children. This paper investigates whether early performance measured shortly after initial amplification predicts language development at 3 years of age. Methodology: This is a prospective, population-based study. We assessed outcomes at 6- and 12-months after amplifica- tion, and then at 3 and 5 years of age. Main outcome measures included directly-assessed language, receptive vocabulary, speech production; and parent-reported functional performance in everyday life. A range of demographic and audiologi- cal information was also collected at evaluation intervals. Results: About 450 children participated, and 3-year outcomes scores were available for 356 participants. Multiple regression analysis revealed that early language scores or functional performance ratings were significant predictors of 3-year outcomes. Other significant predictors included the presence or absence of additional disabilities, severity of hearing loss, and age at cochlear implant activation. Conclusions: Early performance, either directly-assessed language ability (PLS-4) or parent-reported functional ratings (PEACH), were significant predictors of 3-year outcomes; along with presence or absence of additional disabilities, severity of hearing loss, and age at CI activation. Earlier implantation is possible with early detection of hearing loss via UNHS. Monitoring performance after initial amplification allows preventive strategies to be implemented early to improve outcomes.
Issue:
Suppl. 21, 2013


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Predicting 3-year outcomes of early-identified children with hearing impairment