Title:
Quantifying the bystander-effect of 2.5G mobile telephones on the speech perception of digital hearing aid users
Authors:
P. V. Vlastarakos , T. P. Nikolopoulos , L. Manolopoulos , A. Stamou ,K. Halkiotis , E. Ferekidis and E. Georgiou5
Institutions:
ENT Department, Lister Hospital, UK; ENT Department, Atticon University Hospital, Athens, Greece; ENT 3 Department, Hippokrateion General Hospital of Athens, Greece; Siemens-S.Stamou Co, Athens, Greece; Medical 5 Physics Laboratory, University of Athens, Greece
Keywords:
Mobile phones; cell phones; hearing aids; interference; effect; speech perception
Pages:
95 - 101
Abstract:
Quantifying the bystander-effect of 2.5G mobile telephones on the speech perception of digital hearing aid users. Objective: To quantify the bystander-effect of 2.5G mobile telephones (2.5G-MTs) on the speech perception of digital hearing-aid (dHA) users. Differences in the susceptibility of behind-the-ear (BTE) compared to in-to-the-ear (ITE) dHAs were also assessed. Materials/Methods: Prospective-comparative study conducted at a tertiary referral centre (ENT Department) and a HA-fitting laboratory. Key-word recognition scores from open-sentence lists were calculated. Power-analysis deter- mined that a minimum of 60 subjects with SNHL (30 in each group), using either BTE or ITE dHAs, were required for reliable study outcomes. Sixty-four adults were tested with a functioning 2.5G-MT at almost physical contact with their ear; thirty subjects used BTE and 34 ITE dHAs. Main outcome measures:Aided word recognition score differences between studied groups and within each group, while a 2.5G-MT was activated. Cut-off inclusion criterion regarding baseline aided word recognition score was 75%. Results: Baseline aided word recognition scores for ITE dHAs were better compared to BTE ones (p<0.01). Following the 2.5G-MT activation, this difference disappeared. No statistically significant difference in word recognition was observed between the examined groups, or within the BTE group, from the bystander-effect of the 2.5G-MT. ITE dHAs proved more susceptible to electromagnetic interference (p<0.05). Conclusion: The bystander-effect of 2.5G-MTs on the speech perception of dHA users is either minimal, or not signifi- cant. The observed compatibility has a positive impact on the lives of millions of people worldwide. The long-standing theory of more interference in BTE compared to ITE HAs is not confirmed by the results of the present study. EBM level of evidence: 2c.
Issue:
Vol. 8, 2012, 2nd trimester


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Quantifying the bystander-effect of 2.5G mobile telephones on the speech perception of digital hearing aid users