Title:
Sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: combination therapy with the Pillar ® palatal implant technique and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A preliminary report
Authors:
F. Bertoletti*, A. Indelicato*, P. Banfi** and B. Capolunghi*
Institutions:
*Department of Otorhinolaryngology “Mellino Mellini” Hospital, Chiari (Brescia), Italy; **Fondazione Serena Onlus, Centro Clinico NeMO, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan, Italy
Keywords:
Sleep apnoea/Hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS); Pillar Palatal Implant
Pages:
251 - 257
Abstract:
Sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: combination therapy with the Pillar palatal implant technique and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A preliminary report. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of reducing CPAP pressure levels and improving patient adherence to CPAP therapy by stiffening the soft palate tissue with a Pillar palatal implant. Many patients have difficulty complying with CPAP therapy if high levels of airway pressure are necessary for their therapy to be successful. Twenty-one patients (16 males and 5 females) with moderate to severe OSAHS treated with CPAP therapy underwent Pillar palatal treatment in an office-based procedure. The mean age was 49.6 ± 11.2 years, mean baseline body mass index (BMI) was 31.4 ± 3.2 Kg/m . At 3 months follow-up a significant reduction of CPAP pressure levels was found. Mean CPAP pressure levels before and after Pillar application were 11.2 ± 1.69 cm H2O vs 9.3 ± 2.5 cm H2O respectively (p<0.001). The Pillar system is intended for use in stiffening the soft palate tissue, so this minimally invasive procedure, which was introduced to clinical practice as a treatment for the palatal component of OSAHS, could make it possible to reduce CPAP pressures and improve patient adherence to CPAP therapy. The preliminary results of this combined therapeutic approach indicate the safety and efficacy of the treatment of OSAHS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long- term results.
Issue:
Vol. 5, 2009, 4th trimester


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Sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: combination therapy with the Pillar ® palatal implant technique and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A preliminary report